GPS Study

GPS 2.0

This study aims to determine the feasibility of obtaining spatial behavior data via GPS devices over a two-week period from a sample of 150 Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jackson, MS. The study also aims to characterize the relationship between neighborhood-level with substance use and sexual risk behaviors using activity spaces defined by GPS devices among the sample of 150 Black MSM in Jackson. All participants complete a second two-week protocol three months later, except participants will be assigned to one of three arms that involve reminders for return appointments, to carry the GPS device, and to charge the GPS device. Furthermore, surveys are required for two enrollment appointments at the start of the project and at month 3, as well as two completion appointments at the start of the project and at month 3.

Project Staff:

Project Coordinator:
Cordarian Draper
cdraper@mbk-inc.org
Project Evaluator:
Daniel Chavez-Yenter, MPH
(601) 957-7710 Ext. 103
dchavez-yenter@mbk-inc.org

GPS 1.0

The goals of this study are to determine the feasibility of obtaining GPS data to define activity space neighborhoods and examine the associations between neighborhood-level factors, drug use and HIV risk behaviors among young Black MSM in the Jackson, MS metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Another goal is to utilize real-time geospatial methods to investigate the relationships between GPS-defined activity space neighborhoods with drug use and sexual risk behaviors among Black MSM in the Jackson, MS MSA. One specific aim is to examine the feasibility (as measured by a pre- and post-survey as well as objectively measured adherence to the GPS protocol) of obtaining GPS spatial behavior data to define activity space neighborhoods in a sample of 100 Black MSM residing in Jackson, MS; Hattiesburg, MS; Gulfport, MS; and New Orleans, LA. Another specific aim is to examine associations between neighborhood-level factors (such as neighborhood poverty, LGBT neighborhood friendliness, access to sexual health services based on one’s activity space), drug use and HIV risk behaviors (e.g., condomless anal sexual behavior, having multiple and concurrent sexual partners) in a sample of 100 Black MSM residing in Jackson, MS; Hattiesburg, MS; Gulfport, MS; and New Orleans, LA. Emerging research shows that MSM experience multiple neighborhoods when, for example, finding sexual partners, drugs and alcohol as well as frequenting venues where drugs and condomless sex is the norm. Finally, virtually no studies have been conducted on neighborhood determinants of drug use and HIV risk among Black MSM specifically and the majority of the neighborhood health research has been conducted among MSM populations in urban areas such as New York City and San Francisco.

Project Staff:

Project Coordinator:
Cordarian Draper
cdraper@mbk-inc.org